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Integrated Pest Management

Integrated Pest Management

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Integrated Pest Management

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  1. Integrated Pest Management Melissa Graves Plant ID Diagnostician Schutter Diagnostic Lab

  2. What is IPM? • Components of an effective IPM • program • Advantages of using IPM • Challenges of implementing IPM • New resources available for IPM Integrated Pest Management

  3. What Is IPM? • An effective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management based on current, comprehensive information regarding pest life cycles and their interaction with the environment. • Used to manage pest damage by the most economical means, with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment.

  4. 4-Tiered Approach to IPM • Set action thresholds • Monitor and identify potential pests • Prevention • Control

  5. Management Plan • Selection of plants • Nutrient management • Pest management • Possible control techniques • Review and update

  6. Know Your Action Threshold • What is the “action threshold” Pest density at which control measures should be implemented to prevent economic loss from occuring • What is the economic injury limit? The point when the economic benefit of treatment is greater than the cost

  7. Determining Action Threshold

  8. Monitoring

  9. Pest Identification • Why is it important? • Accurate diagnosis of problems • Appropriate management plans or policies • Correct treatment measures

  10. Possible Pest Problem?

  11. Beneficial Insects Photo courtesy of Dan Papacek Photo courtesy of Dan Papacek

  12. Invasive Plants Yellow Starthistle • Annual • Single yellow flower per branch • ¾ -1 inch spines radiating from flower bracts • Grayish-green foliage • “Winged” stem Photos by Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org

  13. Invasive Plants White Bryony Vine Small yellow-green or yellow-white flowers Pea-sized black berries Dark green, palmately lobed leaves Single curling tendril at each leaf node Montana State University Montana State University Extension Extension White Bryony (Bryonia alba) White Bryony (Bryonia alba) White bryony (Bryonia alba), an invasive plant species introduced to the Pacific Northwest in the 1970’s, has been confirmed in Bozeman, Montana. It is a highly invasive species, growing up to six inches per day, with the potential to smother and damage established plants. The fruit from this plant is very toxic to people, with as few as 40 berries being fatal to an adult. This species is found in areas as diverse as river drainages, mountain terrain, and arid locations.Its native range includes temperate Asia, parts of the Mediterranean, the Russian republic, and north to Sweden.Bryony has been reported in six counties in Montana including: Missoula, Gallatin, Park, Sweetgrass, Stillwater, and Big Horn. If you find this plant please contact Melissa Graves at (406) 994-5690 or send plant samples to 121 Plant BioScience Building, Montana State University, Bozeman MT 59717. White bryony (Bryonia alba), an invasive plant species introduced to the Pacific Northwest in the 1970’s, has been confirmed in Bozeman, Montana. It is a highly invasive species, growing up to six inches per day, with the potential to smother and damage established plants. The fruit from this plant is very toxic to people, with as few as 40 berries being fatal to an adult. This species is found in areas as diverse as river drainages, mountain terrain, and arid locations.Its native range includes temperate Asia, parts of the Mediterranean, the Russian republic, and north to Sweden.Bryony has been reported in six counties in Montana including: Missoula, Gallatin, Park, Sweetgrass, Stillwater, and Big Horn. If you find this plant please contact Melissa Graves at (406) 994-5690 or send plant samples to 121 Plant BioScience Building, Montana State University, Bozeman MT 59717. Montana State University Montana State University Schutter Diagnostic Laboratory 121 Plant BioScience Building Bozeman MT 59717 Photograph of white bryony showing palmately lobed leaves, yellow-green to yellow-white flowers, and immature berries. The berries turn black at maturity. Schutter Diagnostic Laboratory 121 Plant BioScience Building Bozeman MT 59717 Photograph of white bryony showing palmately lobed leaves, yellow-green to yellow-white flowers, and immature berries. The berries turn black at maturity. Phone: 406-994-5690 Fax: 406-994-7600 E-mail: melissa.graves@montana.edu Phone: 406-994-5690 Fax: 406-994-7600 E-mail: melissa.graves@montana.edu

  14. Invasive Plants Bohemian Knotweed Shrub Small white flowers Hollow, cane-like stems Heart or spade shaped leaves Short, broad based (triangular) hairs on underside of leaves Montana State University Montana State University Extension Extension White Bryony (Bryonia alba) White Bryony (Bryonia alba) White bryony (Bryonia alba), an invasive plant species introduced to the Pacific Northwest in the 1970’s, has been confirmed in Bozeman, Montana. It is a highly invasive species, growing up to six inches per day, with the potential to smother and damage established plants. The fruit from this plant is very toxic to people, with as few as 40 berries being fatal to an adult. This species is found in areas as diverse as river drainages, mountain terrain, and arid locations.Its native range includes temperate Asia, parts of the Mediterranean, the Russian republic, and north to Sweden.Bryony has been reported in six counties in Montana including: Missoula, Gallatin, Park, Sweetgrass, Stillwater, and Big Horn. If you find this plant please contact Melissa Graves at (406) 994-5690 or send plant samples to 121 Plant BioScience Building, Montana State University, Bozeman MT 59717. White bryony (Bryonia alba), an invasive plant species introduced to the Pacific Northwest in the 1970’s, has been confirmed in Bozeman, Montana. It is a highly invasive species, growing up to six inches per day, with the potential to smother and damage established plants. The fruit from this plant is very toxic to people, with as few as 40 berries being fatal to an adult. This species is found in areas as diverse as river drainages, mountain terrain, and arid locations.Its native range includes temperate Asia, parts of the Mediterranean, the Russian republic, and north to Sweden.Bryony has been reported in six counties in Montana including: Missoula, Gallatin, Park, Sweetgrass, Stillwater, and Big Horn. If you find this plant please contact Melissa Graves at (406) 994-5690 or send plant samples to 121 Plant BioScience Building, Montana State University, Bozeman MT 59717. Montana State University Montana State University Schutter Diagnostic Laboratory 121 Plant BioScience Building Bozeman MT 59717 Photograph of white bryony showing palmately lobed leaves, yellow-green to yellow-white flowers, and immature berries. The berries turn black at maturity. Schutter Diagnostic Laboratory 121 Plant BioScience Building Bozeman MT 59717 Photograph of white bryony showing palmately lobed leaves, yellow-green to yellow-white flowers, and immature berries. The berries turn black at maturity. Phone: 406-994-5690 Fax: 406-994-7600 E-mail: melissa.graves@montana.edu Phone: 406-994-5690 Fax: 406-994-7600 E-mail: melissa.graves@montana.edu

  15. How to Act?

  16. Cultural • crop rotation • pest resistant varieties • pest-free rootstock • eliminating “pest homes” • Biological • beneficial insects • grazing • use of pheromones Management Techniques

  17. Chemical • pesticides • herbicides • fungicides • Mechanical • mowing • tilling Management Techniques

  18. IPM Techniques

  19. IPM Advantages • Slows development of pesticide resistance • Reduces risk to spray operators and the environment • Step towards sustainability • Proactive • Site-specific • Business opportunity in scouting/monitoring

  20. Challenges of IPM Implementation • More complex than control by chemicals alone • Requires understanding of pest and beneficial species interactions • Knowledge of management options

  21. Available Resources

  22. Using Technology in IPM

  23. Using Technology in IPM

  24. Using Technology in IPM

  25. Additional Training • IPM Training • Live workshops • Webinars (internet-based seminars) offered through the Schutter Diagnostic Lab and the National Plant Diagnostic Network (www.npdn.org) • Existing Pesticide Applicator Training programs from MSU and the MDOA • Urban IPM certification through MSU • First detector training through MSU

  26. Urban IPM Program Objectives • Establish an IPM certification program for urban landscape and turf professionals • Develop resources for IPM in the urban landscape, specific to Montana • Train you to be First Detectors for invasive pests • Educate homeowners/consumers in the basic principles of IPM

  27. Urban IPM Workshop

  28. Additional Online Resources • Bugwood Network (http://wiki.bugwood.org/Main_Page) • High Plains IPM (http://wiki.bugwood.org/HPIPM:Main_Page) • Montana Extension (http:/www.msuextension.org) • eXtension (http://extension.org) • Invaders Database (http://invader.dbs.umt.edu) • Great Plains Diagnostic Network (http://www.gpdn.org) • National Plant Diagnostic Network (http:www.npdn.org) • Schutter Diagnostic Lab (http://diagnostics.montana.edu)