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BEGIN WITH TOPIC SENTENCE

BEGIN WITH TOPIC SENTENCE

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BEGIN WITH TOPIC SENTENCE

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Presentation Transcript

  1. BEGIN WITH TOPIC SENTENCE BEGIN WITH TOPIC SENTENCE

  2. Chesterfield’s threats to his son reveal his need for superiority.

  3. PUT YOUR EXAMPLES IN CONTEXT—BACKGROUND OF THE QUOTE/SECTION

  4. After initially praising his son’s judgment, Chesterfield reminds him that as a son he has no value without his father’S GOOD WILL.

  5. PUT SPECIFIC OR QUOTE IN. NEVER EVER LEAVE A QUOTE ON ITS OWN OR IN ITS OWN SENTENCE.

  6. Chesterfield reminds his son that he is “absolutely dependent up on [him]” for everything he has in his life (line 26).

  7. CONNECT QUOTE/SPECIFIC TO TOPIC SENTENCE.

  8. Chesterfield’s use of the word “absolutely” illustrates his superiority, particularly after he has praised his son’s judgment. He emphasizes that, while his son may have better judgment than his peers, he is still beholden to his father. Chesterfield continues to remind his son of his dependence on his father.

  9. EVALUATE THE NEED FOR A SECOND EXAMPLE—IS THERE ENOUGH EVIDENCE?

  10. CONNECT TO TOPIC SENTENCE/THESIS

  11. Although Chesterfield’s son is away from his father, Chesterfield still feels the need to control him, clearly valuing superiority over empathy.

  12. Chesterfield’s threats to his son reveal his need for superiority. After initially praising his son’s judgment, Chesterfield reminds him that as a son he has no value without his father. CHESTERFIELD REMINDS HIS SON THAT HE IS “ABSOLUTELY DEPENDENT UPON [HIM]” FOR EVERYTHING HE HAS IN HIS LIFE (LINE 26). Chesterfield’s use of the word “absolutely” illustrates his superiority, particularly after he has praised his son’s judgment. He emphasizes that, while his son may have better judgment than his peers, he is still beholden to his father. Chesterfield continues to remind his son of his dependence on his father. Although Chesterfield’s son is away from his father, Chesterfield still feels the need to control him, clearly valuing superiority over empathy.