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FIGURE 5.1 PowerPoint Presentation

FIGURE 5.1

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FIGURE 5.1

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  1. FIGURE 5.1 MAP OF CORPORATE STAKEHOLDER ACCOUNTABILITY Shareholders Activists Employees Governments Customers Corporation Creditors Suppliers Others, including the Media, who can be affected by or who can affect the achievement of the corporation’s objectives Lenders

  2. Accountability = Financial & StrategicincludingEthical & Legal Whistle- Blowers Professional Accountants Including Internal Auditors Ethics Officer FIGURE 5.2 STAKEHOLDER ACCOUNTABILITY ORIENTED GOVERNANCE PROCESS SHAREHOLDERS + OTHER STAKEHOLDERS PUBLICINTEREST All Interests Sets Vision, Mission, Strategy, Policies, Codes, Compliance, Feedback, Compensation Appoints CEO, CFO BOARD OF DIRECTORS External Auditors Lawyers Guidance Feedback CORPORATE CULTURE Created by Management Leads to Corporate Actions Financial Reports

  3. SHAREHOLDERS + OTHER STAKEHOLDERS PUBLICINTEREST CORPORATE CULTURE Created by Management Leads to Corporate Actions Actions Motivation Beliefs Values FIGURE 5.3 STAKEHOLDER INTERESTS RANKING, RISK ASSESSMENT, AND USAGE Accountability = Financial & Strategic including Ethical & Legal All Interests Sets Vision, Mission, Strategy, Policies, Codes, Compliance, Feedback, Compensation Appoints CEO, CFO CORPORATE RISK ASSESSMENT BOARD OF DIRECTORS Integrate Into Corporate Value System & Actions Identify All Stakeholders Assess & Rank All Interests Prepared by management for Board review and approval Guidance Feedback

  4. FIGURE 5.4 ALIGNING VALUES FOR ETHICAL MOTIVATION AND ACTION IdentificationAssessmentRank StakeholderInterests CorporateValue System CorporateValue System ReportsObservations StakeholderEvaluation ValuesTransmission Policies, CodesReinforcement CORPORATE CULTURE Created by Management Leads to Corporate Actions OtherInfluences Actions Motivation Beliefs Values

  5. TABLE 5.1 CULTURAL VALUES AND HYPERNORMS

  6. TABLE 5.2 AREAS OF CORPORATE RISK ASSESSMENT

  7. TABLE 5.3 ETHICS RISK MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

  8. FIGURE 5.5 CONFLICT OF INTEREST FOR A DECISION MAKER Special Non-P Interests Decision Maker (D) has a duty to act/judge in P’s best interest P’s Satisfaction basedon Fulfillment of P’s Interests

  9. FIGURE 5.6 TYPES OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST Potential Actual Decision Point Non-existent Apparent Imaginary

  10. TABLE 5.4 CAUSES OF CONFLICTING INTERESTS

  11. TABLE 5.5 MANAGEMENT OF CONFLICTING INTERESTS

  12. TABLE 5.6 GUIDELINES FOR ACCEPTANCE OF GIFTS OR PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT

  13. ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS • ELEMENTS OFORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE • Assumptions • Values • Narratives • Symbols • Heroes • Rites, Ceremonies,Rituals FIRST LEVEL • Attendance • Turnover • Productivity • Work Quality • Recruiting Success INDIVIDUAL/TEAMOUTCOMES • Job/Career Satisfaction • Organizational Identification • Job Involvement • Commitment • Discretionary Effort • Job Performance SECOND LEVEL • REINFORCERS OFORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE • Mission/Vision • Leadership skills • Growth/Development Opportunities • Team Development • Communication • Performance Management Systems • Incentives and Rewards • Human Resource Systems • Creativity/Innovation • Problem Solving • Team Cohesiveness and Communication THIRD LEVEL • Market Share • Profitability • Achievement of Formal Org. Goals FIGURE 5.7 ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, INDIVIDUAL/TEAM OUTCOMES, AND ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS A Model of the Impact of Organizational Culture on Individual/Team Outcomes and Organizational Effectiveness, The Business Case for Culture Change, W. Reschke & R. Aldag, Center for Organizational Effectiveness, August 2000.

  14. TABLE 5.7 ETHICS PROGRAM ORIENTATION TYPES

  15. TABLE 5.8 ETHICAL CULTURE: IMPORTANT ASPECTS

  16. TABLE 5.9 ETHICAL PROGRAMS’ USUAL DIMENSIONS

  17. TABLE 5.10 PRESENCE OF PROGRAM ELEMENTS PER KPMG INTEGRITY SURVEY 2005-2006

  18. TABLE 5.11 ETHICS PROGRAMS AFFECTS ON BEHAVIORS AND PERCEPTIONS, per KPMG INTEGRITY SURVEY 2005-2006

  19. TABLE 5.12 DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF AN ETHICAL CORPORATE CULTURE

  20. TABLE 5.13 DEPTHS OF CODE COVERAGE

  21. TABLE 5.14 DOMINANT RATIONALES FOR CODES BY REGION

  22. TABLE 5.15 CODE GUIDANCE ALTERNATIVES AND THE CONTROL/MOTIVATION SIGNALED

  23. TABLE 5.16 SUBJECTS FOUND IN CODES

  24. TABLE 5.17 EXTERNAL SHOCKS AND INFLUENCES TRIGGERING CODE MODIFICATION

  25. TABLE 5.18 ESSENTIAL FEATURES TO DEMONSTRATE A DUE DILIGENCE DEFENCE IN RESPECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS

  26. TABLE 5.19 MECHANISMS FOR COMMPLIANCE ENCOURAGEMENT, MONITORING, AND REPORTING WRONGDOING

  27. TABLE 5.20 U.S. SENTENCING GUIDELINESETHICS CRITERIA per KPMG INTEGRITY SURVEY 2005-2006

  28. TABLE 5.21 EMERGING PUBLIC ACCOUNTABILITY STANDARDS AND INITIATIVES