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Kansas School-wide Positive Behavior Support Training

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Kansas School-wide Positive Behavior Support Training

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  1. Kansas School-wide Positive Behavior Support Training Tier One Initial TrainingTeam- Day 1 Lea Ann Pasquale and Jamie Wolfe District SWPBS Facilitators

  2. Year One • Getting Started (Today & Tomorrow) • Overview, School-wide, Non-classroom, Data Decisions, Team Meetings, Team Planning • Expanding Implementation (January) • Classroom, Escalation Cycle, Team Status Check, Annual Planning Reports, Team Planning • Sustaining Efforts (April) • Individual Student, Targeted-group, Team Planning, Long-term Action Planning, Movement Towards Tier Two

  3. Day 1 Overview of School-wide PBS Developing Teaching Strategies with Faculty Input Rewarding & Acknowledging Students and Staff Team and Faculty Planning Day 2 Assess Interest & Commitment OngoingData-based Decision Making Begin Self Assessment Enhancing Discipline Procedures Team and Faculty Planning Training Content

  4. Overview of School-wide PBS Getting Started

  5. Factors Contributing to Antisocial Behaviors • School • Community • Home

  6. Home (e.g., Dishion & Patterson) • Inconsistent management • Reactive discipline • Lack of monitoring

  7. Community (e.g., Biglan) • Antisocial network of peers • Lack of pro-social engagements

  8. School (e.g., Mayer) • Reactive/punishing discipline approach • Lack of agreement about rules, expectations, & consequences • Lack of staff support • Failure to consider & accommodate individual differences • Academic failure

  9. When Behavior Doesn’t Improve, We “Get Tougher!” • Zero tolerance policies • Increased surveillance • Increased suspension & expulsion • In-service training by expert • Alternative programming …..Predictable systems response!

  10. Reliance on Punishment = Increases in Problem Behavior • Punishing problem behaviors without a school-wide system of support is associated with increased • Aggression • Vandalism • Truancy • Tardiness • School Drop Out Rates (Mayer, 1995; Mayer & Sulzer-Azaroff, 1991)

  11. Responses to Antisocial Behavior • Reviews of over 500 studies indicate that the least effective responses to school violence are • Punishment • Counseling • Psychotherapy • Exclusion is the most common response for conduct disordered youth (Lane & Murakami, 1987)

  12. “Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we……..... ……….teach? ………punish?” Tom Herner(NASDE President ), 1998

  13. The most effective responses educators can make to school violence include: • Social skills instruction • Behaviorally based interventions • Academic interventions

  14. Character Education • Easy to change moral knowledge..... ...difficult to change moral conduct • To change moral conduct... • Adults & students model moral behavior • Students must experience academic success • Students must be taught social skills for success

  15. Preparing for Adult Settings: Toyota Service Department • We will treat you with respect • We will be responsible for ourselves & you • We will do our best • Safety is our primary goal

  16. Native Alaskan Community Values Example of Cup’ik Values • Help other people • Respect other people’s belongings • Respect the animals you catch for food • Remember what you are taught and told Saint Lawrence Island Yup’ik Values • Give service to others • Gather wisdom and knowledge Oleksa, M. (2005). Another culture/ Another world. Association of Alaska School Boards

  17. Main Message! Successful Individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable (Zins & Ponti, 1990)

  18. School-wide PBS is… • Not a curriculum…it’s systems approach for preventing problem behavior • Not limited to any particular group of students…it’s for all students • Not new…its based on long history of behavioral practices & effective instructional design & strategies

  19. CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~80% of Students

  20. School-wide Systems 1. Common purpose & approach to discipline 2. Clear set of positive expectations & behaviors 3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior 4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior 5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior 6. Procedures for on-going monitoring & evaluation

  21. Classroom Management Systems • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught & encouraged • Teaching classroom routines & cuestaught & encouraged • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student interaction • Active supervision • Redirections for minor, infrequent behavior errors • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors • Effective academic instruction & curriculum

  22. Nonclassroom Systems • Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged • Active supervision by all staff • Scan, move, interact • Precorrections & reminders • Positive reinforcement

  23. Individual Student System • Behavioral competence at school & district levels • Function-based behavior support planning • Team- & data-based decision making • Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes • Targeted social skills & self-management instruction • Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations

  24. Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive School-Wide Systems for Student Success & Multi-tier System of Supports TIER III 1-5% 1-5% TIER II 5-10% 5-10% TIER I 80-90% 80-90%

  25. Reading All Students Open Court + Workshop K 70 min. of core 1-3 90 min. core + 30 min. 4-6 60 min. core + 30 min. workshop + 30 min. LA DIBELS K-6 F/W/Sp MAP 3-6 F Behavior All school settings Teach 3-5 expected social behaviors determined by staff Encourage positive behaviors systematically Clear and consistent response to problem behavior Data system to monitor Tier One interventions

  26. Reading All students demonstrating need for strategic assistance Workshop time (30 min.) with front-line intervention 3-5x per week in groups < 5 DIBELS progress monitoring every 2 weeks Diagnostic data as necessary Behavior Students with 2-5 ODR Available throughout the day Implemented quickly Low effort by teachers Consistent with school-wide expectations Student chooses to participate Group interventions FBA using existing data sources with diagnostic data as necessary

  27. Reading • All students demonstrating • need for intensive • assistance • Workshop time (30 min.) • + 30 additional min. with • front-line intervention 5x • per week in groups < 3 • DIBELS progress • monitoring weekly • Diagnostic data as • necessary • Problem-Solving Team • likely expanded • Behavior • Students with 5 or more ODR’s • or needing more intense • problem-solving • FBA with more intensive • supports addressing function of • behavior • More frequent and specific • monitoring • Team-based approach • Person-centered • planning/wraparound

  28. ٭ One Response, Many Terms:“Positive Behavior Support” PBS is a broad range of systemic & individualized strategies for achieving important social & learning outcomes while preventing problem behavior with all students. “SWPBS” = “EBS” = “PBS” = “PBIS” etc.

  29. Same Issue in MTSS:One Triangle, Many Terms • Primary Prevention = Universal = Core = Tier 1 • Secondary Prevention = Targeted Interventions = Strategic = Tier 2 • Tertiary Prevention = Intensive = Tier 3

  30. Why Does this Happen? • National efforts with many different people involved • Evolution of academic and behavioral systems change • University professionals starting with different funds • George Sugai leads the way with his EBS center • SWPBS with Rob Horner joins forces with George’s school-wide discipline • Technology professionals who like short titles • Strange unexplained resistance to fixing title discrepancies (in SWPBS) • What makes us strong (many people with many ideas) also makes us a little inconsistent • Systems Change has a way of adding complexity

  31. Moving Away From Ineffective Responses to Problem Behavior • Get Tough (practices) • Train-&-Hope(systems)

  32. Continuum of Behavior Support Local Context & Culture SWPBS Features Science of Human Behavior Prevention Logic Systems Change & Durability Evidence- Based Practices Natural Implementers

  33. Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  34. SWPBS Implementation Logic

  35. Year 1 SWPBS Training: Primary Prevention

  36. Elements of School-wide PBS • Establish interest & commitment • Establish a data-based decision-making system • Modify discipline referral process/forms • Establish expectations & rules • Develop lesson plans & teach • Create an acknowledgement system • Refine consequences • Monitor, evaluate, and modify

  37. Instructional Approach • Behavioral expectations taught directly • Teach social behaviors like academic skills • Academic engagement & success are maximized • Influence of instructional support is considered

  38. Apache’s Average Referrals Per Day Per Month SWIS Data

  39. Apache’s Instructional and Academic Time Regained

  40. Apache’s Instructional and Academic Time Regained

  41. Apache’s DIBELS Data Spring DIBELS Data

  42. Teaching Guidelines • Behavior management problems are instructional problems. • Process for teaching social behaviors & academic skills is fundamentally same. • Emphasis is on teaching functional & prosocial replacement behaviors. • Instructional supports are important.

  43. Teaching Expectations • School-Wide Expectations • Safe • Respectful • Responsible • Defining and Teaching • Taught by teachers • Reviewed by office staff • Posted around school • Letter home to parents

  44. Guidelines • Use continuum of strategies to teach expectations • teach expected behavior • increase opportunities for academic and social success • provide positive feedback more often than corrections and reprimands (e.g., 6 to 1) • move from tangible to social reinforcement • move from external to self-managed reinforcement • individualize reinforcement

  45. Creating School-wide Expectations • Limited in number 3-5 • Positively stated • Aligned with mission statement/policies • Broadly stated • Applies to everyone

  46. Examples of School-wide Expectations • Be Safe • Be Respectful • Be Responsible • Be Ready • Be On-Task • Follow Directions • Honor Diversity • Be a Problem Solver

  47. Defining Expectations • Identify broad Expectations that apply to all settings within the school • Be Safe • Be Respectful • Be Responsible

  48. Defining Expectations • Define key environments • Classroom • Hallway • Cafeteria • Events • Transportation

  49. Defining Expectations • Define observable behaviors that become rules that define the broader expectations • Walk in the hallways • Stay to the right except when directed otherwise in hallways