slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 10: Population Dynamics PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 10: Population Dynamics

play fullscreen
1 / 55

Chapter 10: Population Dynamics

264 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Chapter 10: Population Dynamics

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Chapter 10: Population Dynamics Dispersal Age Structure A B 13 Survivorship Metapopulation D C

  2. E) Population Growth Nt = Noert Exponential Growth Logistic Growth

  3. Extreme Population Growth I 1 2

  4. ZEBRA MUSSEL Native to the Streams of Southern Russia 3

  5. Zebra Mussel Distribution First Detected in US 1988 4

  6. Reasons? Consequences?

  7. Extreme Population Growth II

  8. Sea Lamprey Invasion 1

  9. Sea Lamprey Invasion (First Noted in Great Lakes in 1830s) Erie Canal Weiland Canal

  10. Lamprey and Lake Trout Populations Lampricides http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/v1/n6/images/nchembio1105-316-F1.gif

  11. Other Invasive Species in North America “Rock Snot” Diatom Didymospehnia geminata Eurasian Collared Dove

  12. Other Invasive Species in North America Salt Cedar (Tamarix sp.) Africanized Honeybee

  13. Extreme Population Growth III (Native Species) 5 Chinch Bug (Blissus leucopterus)

  14. 6

  15. Fig. 14-10 in Ricklefs 2000

  16. Populations are Dynamic!! What factors contribute to changing population size? 7

  17. Factors that Influence Population Size Nt+1 = Nt + B + I - D - E

  18. Rates of Population Change

  19. N Estimating Rates of Population Change: t N t

  20. Quantifying Rates of Population Change (dN / dt) dN f (b, d, i, e) = dt

  21. Quantifying Rates of Population Change (dN / dt) 8 d b 9

  22. Quantifying Rates of Population Change (dN / dt) 10 e i

  23. “The Wild, Wacky World of Dispersal” Fig. 10.2 in Molles 2008

  24. Dispersal: Animal Vectors 5 4 5

  25. Dispersal: Explosive 7 8 Zygomycete Fungus: Pilobolus

  26. Measuring Dispersal Rates 22 23 24 2

  27. Measuring Dispersal Rates 26 27 28

  28. Measuring Dispersal Rates

  29. Dispersal: Natal 12 11

  30. Dispersal: Natal Eurasian Collared Dove: Spread into Europe from Turkey after 1900 Fig. 10.3 in Molles 2006

  31. Dispersal: Natal 10 11 12

  32. Dispersal in Response to Climate Change North America (~ 20,000 Years Ago) Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) 13 14

  33. Dispersal in Response to Climate Change Fig. 10.8 in Molles 2008

  34. DISPERSAL: Response to Short-Term Changes in Food Abundance European Kestrel (Falcotinnunculus) Voles (Microtis sp.)

  35. NUMERICAL RESPONSE Change in Predator Population Density In Response to Prey Population Density Fig. 10.7 in Molles 2006

  36. Dispersal: Drift Fremont Cottonwood

  37. Dispersal: Drift Why aren’t Populations Depleted? Pacific Ocean Fig. 10.8 in Molles 2008 Nerita latissima

  38. Upstream Movement: Migrating and Stationary Populations Rio Claro River (Costa Rica) Pacific Ocean Fig. 10.9 in Molles 2008

  39. Colonization Cycle Rio Claro River (Costa Rica) Pacific Ocean Fig. 10.9 in Molles 2008 Nerita latissima

  40. Expanding Populations (Anthropogenic Factors) European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 12

  41. Expanding Populations (Anthrogenic Factors) European Honeybee Hybrid: Africanized Honey Bee African Honeybee Queen Apis melifera

  42. Expanding Populations (Anthrogenic Factors) Africanized Honey Bee Fig. 10.1 in Molles 2008

  43. Expanding Populations (Anthrogenic Factors) Green Alga Pest: Caulerpa

  44. Expanding Populations (Anthrogenic Factors) Jacques Cousteau Institute (Monaco)

  45. Expanding Populations: Anthropogenic Factors Eurasian Collared Dove: Introduction into Bahamas: mid-1970s 2

  46. Rates of Expansion Fig. 10.5 in Molles 2006

  47. DISPERSAL: Response to Short-Term Changes in Food Abundance European Kestrel (Falcotinnunculus) Voles (Microtis sp.)

  48. NUMERICAL RESPONSE Change in Predator Population Density In Response to Prey Population Density Voles (Microtis sp.) European Kestrel (Falcotinnunculus) Fig. 10.7 in Molles 2006

  49. NUMERICAL RESPONSE MECHANISM: Increased Reproduction OR Increased Dispersal 15 16

  50. Metapopulation (Subpopulations living on Habitat Patches connected by Exchange of Individuals among Patches) 18 Rocky Mountain Parnassian Butterfly (Parnassius smintheus) 19