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Monday Keynote School-wide Positive Behavior Support

Monday Keynote School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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Monday Keynote School-wide Positive Behavior Support

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  1. Monday KeynoteSchool-wide Positive Behavior Support George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS University of Connecticut August 10, 2009 www.pbis.org www.cber.org Dr. Carl Cole, RMC Research, St. Thomas CCole@rmcres.com

  2. PURPOSE School-wide Positive Behavior Support & Special Education • What is SWPBS? • SWPBS & Response-to-Intervention • Special Educators’ Role • PBS Strand: Practices, Systems & Examples

  3. Policy & Practice Examples & Considerations

  4. HR 2597 May 21, 2009“Positive Behavior for Safe & Effective Schools” • ESEA funds for SWPBS • Provisions • Professional development • Safe & Drug Free Communities • Early intervening services & counseling programs • Office of specialized instructional supports

  5. American Recovery & Reinvestment ActIDEA & Title Recovery Funds • Data systems • E.g., SWIS • SWPBS implementation, e.g., • Early Intervening Services IDEA • School-wide Programs (ESEA Title I) • Professional Development (ESEA Title II)

  6. www.PBIS.org

  7. SWPBS about ALL

  8. SWPBS about ALL

  9. What is SWPBS?

  10. Our Challenges……. 2 • 3. NEGATIVE SCHOOL CLIMATE • Bullying & harassment • 447 teacher abs yr • Staff/parents unsafe • 1.REACTIVE MANAGEMENT • 5100 ref/yr • Marcus 14 days det. • 5. COMPETING INITIATIVES • SW discipline • Class manage • Social skills program • 2. POOR ACHIEVEMENT • 25% 3rd at grade • >50% 9th 2+ “F” • 4. INEFFECTIVE SPED • 25% on IEPS • EBD sent to Alt school • Tasha spends day w/ nurse

  11. 10 Worry“Teaching” by Getting Tough Runyon: “I hate this f____ing school, & you’re a dumbf_____.” Teacher: “That is disrespectful language. I’m sending you to the office so you’ll learn never to say those words again….starting now!”

  12. 12 Erroneous assumption that student… • Is inherently “bad” • Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of “aversives” • Will be better tomorrow…….

  13. When behaviorreturns….”Get Tough!” • Clamp down & increase monitoring • Re-re-re-review rules • Extend continuum & consistency of consequences • Establish “bottom line” ...Predictable individual response

  14. When behavior doesn’t improve, we “Get Tougher!” • Zero tolerance policies • Increased surveillance • Increased suspension & expulsion • In-service training by expert • Alternative programming …..Predictable systems response!

  15. But….false sense of safety/security! • Fosters environments of control • Triggers & reinforces antisocial behavior • Shifts accountability away from school • Devalues child-adult relationship • Weakens relationship between academic & social behavior programming

  16. Science of behavior has taught us that students…. • Are NOT born with “bad behaviors” • Do NOT learn when presented contingent aversive consequences ……..Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback

  17. Our Challenges……. 2 • 3. NEGATIVE SCHOOL CLIMATE • Bullying & harassment • 447 teacher abs yr • Staff/parents unsafe • 5. COMPETING INITIATIVES • SW discipline • Class manage • Social skills program • 2. POOR ACHIEVEMENT • 25% 3rd at grade • >50% 9th 2+ “F” • 4. INEFFECTIVE SPED • 25% on IEPS • EBD sent to Alt school • Tasha spends day w/ nurse

  18. Effective Academic Instruction Effective Behavioral Interventions POSITIVE, EFFECTIVE SCHOOL CULTURE (SWPBS) = Continuous & Efficient Data-based Decision Making Systems for Durable & Accurate Implementation

  19. Our Challenges……. 2 • 3. NEGATIVE SCHOOL CLIMATE • Bullying & harassment • 447 teacher abs yr • Staff/parents unsafe • 5. COMPETING INITIATIVES • SW discipline • Class manage • Social skills program • 4. INEFFECTIVE SPED • 25% on IEPS • EBD sent to Alt school • Tasha spends day w/ nurse

  20. 13 VIOLENCE PREVENTION • Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence (2001) • Coordinated Social Emotional & Learning (Greenberg et al., 2003) • Center for Study & Prevention of Violence (2006) • White House Conference on School Violence (2006) • Positive, predictable school-wide climate • High rates of academic & social success • Formal social skills instruction • Positive active supervision & reinforcement • Positive adult role models • Multi-component, multi-year school-family-community effort

  21. 5. COMPETING INITIATIVES • SW discipline • Class management • Social skills programs • Character education • Bully proofing • Life skills • Anger management • HIV/AID education • Conflict management • Drug-free • Parent engagement • School spirit • Violence prevention • Dropout prevention • Relaxation room • Afterschool peer support • School based mental health Our Challenges……. 2 • 5. COMPETING INITIATIVES • SW discipline • Class manage • Social skills program • 4. INEFFECTIVE SPED • 25% on IEPS • EBD sent to Alt school • Tasha spends day w/ nurse

  22. Working Smarter Are outcomes measurable?

  23. Sample Teaming Matrix Are outcomes measurable?

  24. “Response-to-Intervention”

  25. Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT FEW ~5% Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior ~15% SOME Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings 23 ALL ~80% of Students

  26. Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Responsiveness to Intervention Academic Systems Behavioral Systems 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90% Circa 1996

  27. Responsiveness to Intervention

  28. Responsiveness to InterventionAcademic+ Social Behavior

  29. RTI Continuum of Support for ALL Reading Math Soc skills Science Soc Studies Basketball Dec 7, 2007

  30. Sep 06 Sep 08 Feb 08 Feb 07

  31. Sep 06 Feb 07 Sep 08 Feb 08

  32. Sep 06 Feb 07 Sep 08 Feb 08

  33. Sep 06 Feb 07 Sep 08 Feb 08

  34. 2 SWPBS is framework for….

  35. REACT to Problem Behavior WAIT for New Problem Expect, But HOPE for Implementation Select & ADD Practice Hire EXPERT to Train Practice 34 “Train & Hope”

  36. Approach for operationalizing best practice Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement OUTCOMES Supporting Decision Making Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior

  37. SWPBS Practices School-wide Classroom • Smallest # • Evidence-based • Biggest, durable effect Family Non-classroom Student

  38. School-wide • Leadership team • Behavior purpose statement • Set of positive expectations & behaviors • Procedures for teaching SW & classroom-wide expected behavior • Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior • Continuum of procedures for discouraging rule violations • Procedures for on-going data-based monitoring & evaluation

  39. Non-classroom • Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged • Active supervision by all staff • Scan, move, interact • Precorrections & reminders • Positive reinforcement

  40. Classroom • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught & encouraged • Teaching classroom routines & cuestaught & encouraged • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student interaction • Active supervision • Redirections for minor, infrequent behavior errors • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors • Effective academic instruction & curriculum

  41. Family • Continuum of positive behavior support for all families • Frequent, regular positive contacts, communications, & acknowledgements • Formal & active participation & involvement as equal partner • Access to system of integrated school & community resources

  42. Individual Student • Behavioral competence at school & district levels • Function-based behavior support planning • Team- & data-based decision making • Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes • Targeted social skills & self-management instruction • Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations

  43. www.pbis.org Horner, R., & Sugai, G. (2008). Is school-wide positive behavior support an evidence-based practice? OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support. www.pbis.org click “Research” “Evidence Base”

  44. ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS • TERTIARY PREVENTION • Function-based support • Wraparound • Person-centered planning • TERTIARY PREVENTION ~5% ~15% • SECONDARY PREVENTION • Check in/out • Targeted social skills instruction • Peer-based supports • Social skills club • SECONDARY PREVENTION • PRIMARY PREVENTION • Teach SW expectations • Proactive SW discipline • Positive reinforcement • Effective instruction • Parent engagement • PRIMARY PREVENTION ~80% of Students

  45. Team GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS • Readiness agreements, prioritization, & investments • 3-4 year implementation commitment • Local capacity for training, coordination, coaching, & evaluation • Systems for implementation integrity Agreements Data-based Action Plan Evaluation Implementation

  46. SWPBS Systems Implementation Logic www.pbis.org “SWPBSImplementation Blueprint”

  47. Examples

  48. Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment School Rules NO Food NO Weapons NO Backpacks NO Drugs/Smoking NO Bullying