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Calories PowerPoint Presentation

Calories

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Calories

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  1. Nutrition Calories

  2. Calories • “That's loaded with calories!" • "Are you counting your calories?“ • “That is so bad for you it has so many calories” • When people talk about the calories in food, what do you think they mean?

  3. What is a calorie? A calorie is not a tangible thing, it is a unit of measurement — but it doesn't measure weight or length. A calorie is a unit of energy.

  4. Are Calories Bad for You? • Calories aren't bad for you. Your body needs calories for energy. • But eating too many calories — and not burning enough of them off through activity — can lead to weight gain.

  5. Calories and Food • Most foods and drinks contain calories. Some foods, such as lettuce, contain few calories. (A cup of shredded lettuce has less than 10 calories.) • Other foods, like peanuts, contain a lot of calories. (A half of a cup of peanuts has 427 calories.) • You can find out how many calories are in a food by looking at the nutrition facts label.

  6. Calories come from 4 places: • Carbohydrate — 4 calories per g • Protein — 4 calories per g • Fat — 9 calories per g • Alcohol – 7 calories per g • For example, if a serving of potato chips (about 20 chips) has 10 grams of fat, 90 calories are from fat. That's 10 grams X 9 calories per gram.

  7. Calories and YOU • Some people watch their calories if they are trying to lose weight. • Most kids don't need to do this, but all kids can benefit from eating a healthy, balanced diet that includes the right number of calories — not too many, not too few. • But how do you know how many calories you need?

  8. Kids come in all sizes and each person's body burns energy (calories) at different rates, so there isn't one perfect number of calories that a kid should eat. • Recommended range for most school-age kids: 1,600 to 2,500 per day. • Girls tend to need fewer calories than boys.

  9. As boys enter puberty, they will need as many as 2,500 to 3,000 calories per day. • Active kids, girls and boys, will need more calories than kids who are not active.

  10. If you eat more calories than your body needs, the leftover calories are converted to fat. Too much fat can lead to health problems.

  11. To calculate your recommended calorie requirements you need to know the following W = weight in Kgs H = Height in cms Age = Years 1 pound = 0.45 kilograms 1 foot = 30.48 centimeters 1 inch = 2.54 centimeters

  12. The Harris-Benedict Equationfor calculating calorie needs • Men BMR = 66 + (13.7 x W) + (5 x H) - (6.8 x Age) = Daily calorie needs • Women BMR = 665 + (9.6 x W) + (1.8 x H) - (4.7 x Age) = Daily calorie needs • Where: W = weight in Kgs H = Height in cms Age = Years • *Growing adolescents may need slightly higher than calculated* • **Pregnant women add 300calories during 2nd & 3rd trimesters**

  13. The above equation calculates calorie needs for the BMR, which is your resting requirements. You still need to work out calorie requirements for the day including any activities • Multiply your BMR by an activity factor which more closely suits your lifestyle: • Sedentary - none or very little exercise = BMR X 1.2 • Light activity for average of 2 days/week = BMR X 1.375 • Moderate activity exercising 4 days/week = BMR X 1.5 • High activity exercise & sports more than 6 days/week = BMR X 1.7 • Higher activity levels = up to 2 x BMR

  14. Once you know your daily calorie requirements you can make correct adjustments if desired. 3500cal = 1lb body mass

  15. To lose weight it is recommended to decrease daily consumption by 500cal 500cal/day = 3500cal/week = good weight loss Weekly weight loses of more than 1-2lbs is unhealthy and research shows not sustainable

  16. To decrease calorie consumption by 500cal it is recommended that approximately half comes from decrease in food consumption and half comes from increase in activity level.

  17. What does 1 hour of activity look like: • Aerobics (med) = 340cal • Basketball (vigorous) = 680cal • Bowling = 265cal • Housecleaning = 240 cal • Jogging (med) = 612cal • Lying Down/resting = 93cal • Walking (2.5mph) = 204cal • Weight lifting (light) = 272cal • Weight lifting (heavy) = 612cal

  18. How does our body use calories.. • Some people mistakenly believe they have to burn off all the calories they eat or they will gain weight. This isn't true. • Your body needs some calories just to operate • To keep your heart beating and your lungs breathing. • To grow and develop.

  19. What about BMI??? • BMI stands for Body Mass Index • It is a standardized measurement of healthy weight • See handout for more information