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Clauses PowerPoint Presentation

Clauses

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Clauses

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  1. Clauses A cousin of the phrase!

  2. A clause • Is a group of words, which contains a verb and its subject. • Is used as part of a sentence.

  3. The Independent Clause: • Expresses a complete thought. • Can stand by itself as a sentence. • Sentence: • I baked her a cake. • Independent clause: • Since it was my mom’s birthday, I baked her a cake.

  4. Dependent Clauses • Do not express a complete thought. • Cannot stand on their own. *That’s what makes them dependent!

  5. Example: • Dependent Clause: • when I lived in Paris. • Complete sentence: • I was a student when I lived in Paris.

  6. Here comes the tricky part! • Dependent Clauses can act as modifiers themselves. • They can act as either: • Adjective • or • Adverb

  7. Adjective clauses • Like adjective phrases, adjective clauses, act like adjectives. • They describe nouns and pronouns.

  8. What’s the difference? • Adjective Phrase: • The woman in the car is singing. • Adjective Clause: • The woman who is in the car is singing. • The second sentence added who which is the subject of is.

  9. The Relative Pronoun • Adjective clauses almost always begin with special pronouns which relate to another word or idea in the sentence.

  10. Meet the relative pronouns! • Who • Whom • Whose • Which • That

  11. Example of a sentence with relative pronouns • Leonardo da Vinci was the artist who painted the Mona Lisa. • The relative pronoun who begins the clause and relates to the word artist.

  12. Example of a sentence with relative pronouns • Everything that could be done was done. • The relative pronoun that begins the clause and relates to the pronoun everything.

  13. Adverb Clauses • Like adverb phrases, adverb clauses act like adverbs • They describe verbs, adjectives, adverbs.

  14. See the difference! • Adverb Phrase: • During the winter many animals hibernate. • Adverb Clause: • When winter sets in, many animals hibernate.

  15. How? When? Where? Why? How much? How long? Under what conditions? Adverb clauses answer these questions:

  16. A SECRET! • Adjective clauses have to come right after the noun or pronoun they modify. • Daisy looks great in her embroidered collar that actually has daisies on it. • I looked all over for the air conditioner, which I thought was in my room.

  17. More SECRETS! • Adverb clauses can come at the beginning of the sentence. • They can sometimes be switched around and still make sense. • When I came to FFMS I never thought I would last seven years. • I never thought I would last seven years when I came to FFMS.

  18. Clauses A cousin of the phrase!